Beth Armstrong

Christian wife, mom, & author. Doing life with my eyes fixed on Jesus. I walk, I stumble, I fall. But God is big. And this is what I write about… Thanks for stopping by!

JESUS, WHERE’S WALDO, & PROBLEM SOLVING

About 15 years ago or so, the Kansas City Star used to put Where’s Waldo in the lineup of comic strips in their Sunday edition. Back in the day, we spent lots of Sundays with my folks who took the paper faithfully. I remember Sunday after Sunday, lying on the family room floor, poring over each comic strip with an occasional grin or chuckle. But one of my favorite parts of the funny papers was Where’s Waldo. If you’re not familiar with it, it’s one of those seek-and-find type things. Waldo is a kinda geeky looking guy with a red and white striped shirt, round glasses, wacky brown hair, and a red and white stocking cap. Where's WaldoEach cartoon features Waldo tucked away in some crazy, action-packed scene. And your job is to find him. I usually couldn’t. I’d spend a good 5-10 minutes searching for the guy, but wasn’t very successful. Then my oldest son, who was about 4 or 5 at the time, would come scrunch down beside me, and within 30 seconds would say, “There he is, momma!” I thought it was coincidence at first. But week after week, I’d search high and low, studying the scene with a careful eye, trying to find Waldo. I’d find someone who closely resembled Waldo, but not Waldo. Then like I said, Caleb would swoop in, and find him in a heartbeat without even trying.

Sometimes I think solutions to our problems are like this. We search high and low, in what feels like some crazy, action-packed scene. We look the scene (aka our problem) up one side and down the other and just can’t seem to find the solution. For us it’s sometimes grueling and clouded by seeing the same reality over and over again. Someone else, however, can take a look at the same reality and see the solution quickly. They can come in with a different perspective—one that’s not emotionally charged—and see the solution.

But here’s the thing…we don’t like those people. Even though they can see clearly what we should do, we don’t listen to their advice. We brush away their wisdom. It’s a pride thing in us. We have trouble admitting the fact that we have weaknesses and need help. There are times when we should seek out wisdom, help, advice, or counsel from others, but instead we just insist on trying harder ourselves.

You remember the story of Jesus raising Lazarus from the dead? When He stood at the entrance of the tomb and hollered for Lazarus to come out, scripture records that “the dead man came out, his hands and feet wrapped with strips of linen, and a cloth around his face” (John 11:44a).

Why did Jesus do that? Why didn’t Jesus bring Lazarus out all clean and fresh to put a further exclamation point on this miracle? Why did Jesus have Lazarus come out of the tomb all “mummified” like that?

The very next thing Jesus said to those close by was, “Take off the grave clothes and let him go (John 11:44b).” That’s why. Jesus asked whoever was near the tomb to help Lazarus take off what bound him. You see, Jesus knew we needed each other. Jesus knew the value of others stepping in to help, to unbind us, to be hands-on in setting us free from our problems.

If you can’t find Waldo, you might ask Caleb to help you.

If you can’t find the solution to your problem, however, you just might consider the Jesus method—of asking those nearby to help unbind you.

PITIFUL PREOCCUPATIONS

As I went on my daily morning walk this past week, I somehow managed to get a teeny, tiny rock in my tennis shoe. As I was walking this little nuisance went from my heel for a few paces, to the ball of my foot a few paces later, then up underneath my toes. It jostled around from here to there in my shoe every few steps I took. I thought to myself “if only it would land in one spot where it didn’t bother me, I wouldn’t have to stop my walk.” Now, this little nuisance wasn’t the only problem. As I was having this conversation in my head and debating whether or not to stop or keep walking, I was actually listening to a sermon podcast by Bill Hybels. Bill is the pastor at Willow Creek Church in Chicago. I loooooove Bill Hybels. He’s so good, I cling to every word. I don’t want to miss anything he says. But I did because I was distracted by and preoccupied with this stupid little, teeny, tiny pebble in my shoe. I was even trying to tell myself, “Beth, focus on the sermon, not the dumb rock.” But after being distracted and preoccupied by this dumb thing, I realized I missed something key in Bill’s sermon. I was frustrated. And it was so silly…and pitiful really. I went from being encapsulated by a great sermon to distracted and preoccupied with a stupid rock.

I wonder what bigger things in my life I get distracted and preoccupied with? I wonder what key things I miss because I’m distracted and preoccupied? I wonder what distractions and preoccupations I experience that actually steal my joy or rob me of contentment? I wonder what little, insignificant things I get consumed with that get in the way of my missing the bigger, more important picture?

There’s an interesting story in the Old Testament in the book of Esther about guy named Haman. He was the king’s right hand man. He’s the main antagonist in the story of Esther. He was arrogant, proud, and quite full of himself. All the royal officials at the king’s gate were to bow down and honor Haman as directed by the king himself. Only one guy, Mordecai (a Jew), wouldn’t do it. As you can imagine, this ticked off Haman big time. So much so, that Haman didn’t want to only kill Mordecai, he wanted to kill all Jews. Yeah, Haman was a real piece of work. He had issues.

Later in the book, Esther (who was made queen), invited the king and Haman to a banquet. Here’s what happened when Haman left the banquet:

Haman went out that day happy and in high spirits. But when he saw Mordecai at the king’s gate and observed that he neither rose nor showed fear in his presence, he was filled with rage against Mordecai. 10 Nevertheless, Haman restrained himself and went home. Calling together his friends and Zeresh, his wife, 11 Haman boasted to them about his vast wealth, his many sons, and all the ways the king had honored him and how he had elevated him above the other nobles and officials. 12 “And that’s not all,” Haman added. “I’m the only person Queen Esther invited to accompany the king to the banquet she gave. And she has invited me along with the king tomorrow. 13 But all this gives me no satisfaction as long as I see that Jew Mordecai sitting at the king’s gate.” (Esther 5:9-13)

When Haman left the banquet he was “happy and in high spirits.” He was in a great mood, feeling on top of the world. But all that joy was shot to craps when he saw that Mordecai showed him no respect or honor or reverence.

When he arrived home, he went on to brag to his family about how great he was and how everything was going his way. But in the grand scheme of things, it didn’t mean a thing to him because of this little distraction and preoccupation called Mordecai the Jew. Haman couldn’t be truly satisfied, he couldn’t enjoy any of the pomp and circumstance surrounding him because of his preoccupation with one guy. He fixated on this one distraction.

Let me ask you two questions:

  1. What preoccupations or distractions or little nuisances have filled your mind lately to the point of your missing out on something greater? Unfortunately, little things like the person who drives us crazy at work can tend to steal our joy. The unkind comment someone made to us a couple weeks ago can linger and affect our enjoyment of the present. The comparison game can cause such preoccupation that we can’t be satisfied with who we are and what we have.
  2. What would you like to be preoccupied with? Paul writes in Colossians 3:2 “Set your minds on things above, not earthly things.” You see, we have to stay focused on what’s good, godly, and right. Things that God creates, God ordains, God blesses. Those things are worthwhile, important, meaningful, and significant.

If we could only be encapsulated with God and His Word, maybe, just maybe, all of life’s distractions and preoccupations we experience are nothing more than teeny, tiny, pitiful pebbles in our shoe…

 

 

 

 

 

THE KINGDOM OF “SELF-IE”

In May, my husband and I had the privilege of attending the Carrie Underwood concert here in Kansas City. We were given tickets to sit in the Time Warner Executive Suite by one of my husband’s business associates.

I must say, it was a fabulous concert. That girl’s got some pipes on her! She can sing, she can play the guitar, she plays a mean harmonica, and she can all out entertain. I absolutely loved the show.

But something happened in the Time Warner suite that I won’t soon forget. We were joined by eight other people. I’d never met any of them and my husband only knew his business associate and her husband. Two of these eight other people were young girls who were maybe 20 years old. They had plenty to drink while they were there, so they may have been 21, but I’m not convinced of that.

Anyway…when they first came into the suite, they took a few selfies with the stage in the background. I thought nothing of it at the time because many other people (my family included) have done the same thing. But it didn’t stop there. They took selfie after selfie after selfie. While Carrie was performing, they were shooting videos of themselves—with the camera on their phone facing them so they could watch themselves. They sang with Carrie while they videoed themselves, fluffed their hair, and flirted with the camera. They took pictures of themselves in various poses, then texted them to whomever and posted them on social media. They did this over…and over…and over again. I’ve never seen anything like it. I was sorta mesmerized by this all-out display of self-consumption. For about 80-90% of the show, these gals were more enamored with themselves on the screen of their phone than they were with the queen of country music Carrie Underwood.

I was speechless. I was dumbfounded. Again I have never seen anything like this. Ever!

Selfies! Oh my! (And just to be honest…I’ve taken a few of these myself.)

Did you know in 2013, the word “selfie” was the Oxford Dictionary’s word of the year?

This week I heard there were an estimated 93 million selfies taken every day. I also heard it’s estimated that young adults will take around 25,000 pictures of themselves before they die. It’s no wonder there’s a growing concern that this technology is making us more self-obsessed and more narcissistic than ever before.

But self-obsession and narcissism is nothing new. It just has a different (albeit instant and international) form nowadays.

There’s a story in the Old Testament in which King Saul was told to go completely wipe out the Amelikites—including “men and women, children and infants, cattle and sheep, camels and donkeys” (1 Samuel 15:3). It’s a pretty straight-forward command, but Saul didn’t quite carry it out. He spared the king and some of the choice livestock. In his own self-absorption, however, he was thoroughly convinced that he carried out the order completely and gained victory. He was pretty darn proud of himself. So proud, as a matter of fact, he went to the town of Carmel to set up a monument to himself” (1 Samuel 15:12). That’s right, he set up a victory monument in his own honor, to himself, for himself. If King Saul would have had a smartphone back then, you can bet he would have taken several selfies indicative of his insta-victory and put them on insta-display for all his insta-kingdom to see. King Saul, who was once a humble guy, now had become consumed with one kingdom—the kingdom of self.

Kingdom of SelfieRight before we read about King Saul’s “kingdom of self” moment, we read what God thought about him. God said, “I regret that I have made Saul king, because he has turned away from me…” (1 Samuel 15:11). Ouch! God actually said He regretted making Saul king. Yeah, that one stings. But it was because he turned away from God. He was consumed with himself. Why else would he build a monument in his own honor. I mean…who does that?

I know who. Those girls at the Carrie Underwood concert. All the selfies, all the videos they posted on social media, all the fixation on the camera pointed toward themselves were little monuments in their own honor. All about the kingdom of self. All little moments of turning away from God.

Because how can we be all about God and all about ourselves at the same time? Is there room at the top for both of us? 

Matthew Poole said of King Saul, “But the truth is, he was zealous for his own honour and interest, but lukewarm where God only was concerned.”

If we’re zealous for one, we’re lukewarm for the other.

Selfie, anyone?

WHY?…OR WHY NOT? WHICH IS THE BETTER QUESTION?

A few years ago, a kid I knew went through a phase of answering every question you asked him with a question. He would ask you back the same question you asked him, only with a twist. For instance, if you’d ask him, “Why did you shorts on such a cold day?” He’d answer back, “Why not wear shorts on such a cold day?”

If you asked him, “Why did you leave the meeting early?” He’d respond, “Why not leave the meeting early?”

It was always kinda funny, always kinda unique. And when I considered his responses, I had to stop and think to myself, “Well I guess you have a point there! Why not? What would be a legitimate reason why not?” And usually I couldn’t come up with a viable, legitimate reason why not. So my questions (as to why)—which I originally thought were valid and reasonable—were actually not so much.

There’s an interesting story in three of the four gospels in which Jesus is found eating with some “tax collectors and sinners.” (That’s not my wording—that’s actually what the Bible says.)

“Tax collectors and sinners.” I wonder who all might have been lumped in this category back then? And who—what saintly person, group, or entity—got to label them as such?

So Jesus was hanging out with a group of sinners—criminals, reprobates, outlaws, degenerates, troublemakers, and whoever else. Next thing you know, some “high and mighties” come along and see Him doing this. (Gasp! Say it isn’t so!) Yep! There was Jesus (who was sinless) eating dinner and chillin’ with a house full of heathens. Appalled, I’m sure, they immediately ask some of Jesus’ close friends, “Why does He eat with tax collectors and sinners?”

I suppose from their perspective it’s a valid question, right? Why would Jesus—who was perfect, holy, and righteous—hang out with imperfect, unholy, and unrighteous folks? This was an important, legitimate question in their eyes. I mean, these “high and mighties” wouldn’t be caught dead hanging out with anyone who might taint their lily white reputation. So they questioned why. But a more important question in my eyes is “Why not eat with tax collectors and sinners?”

Why NotWhy did Jesus eat with tax collectors and sinners? Because He loved them. Jesus didn’t see their faults and flaws. He saw their faces. He didn’t let their immorality keep Him from seeing them as individuals. He saw past the sin, and saw a somebody.

Why did He hang out with sinners?

Why not?

Far too many of us are afraid to associate with the “tax collectors and sinners” in our world. We’re afraid we might be labeled. We’re too protective of our reputation. We fear we can’t relate. We somehow strangely believe “it’s not the Christian thing to do.”

You see, the skeptical eye, the critical heart, the judgmental perspective looks at Jesus and says “Why in the world are you hanging out with sinners?” But the grace-filled eye, the merciful heart, the open perspective says, “Why in the world wouldn’t you?”

Scripture says that Jesus was a “friend of tax collectors and sinners.” It also says that they were hanging around listening to what He had to say.

Why did Jesus hang out with sinners?

Why not?

Jesus chose to do life with the sinners, the outcasts, the heathens, and all kinds of disreputable folks. So why don’t we?

 

A LIFE CUT SHORT

A life lived
A life of giving
Of bringing joy
Of blessing

Enjoyed by others
Even revered
Honored
Valued

Touched by so many
Impacted by numerous
Influenced by scores
Won over by countless

Not a perfect life
A life with scars and wounds
But learned from
And shaped by

We take for granted
This thing called life
Breezing past
Day by day

Forgetting to cherish
Forgetting to enjoy
Neglecting to embrace
Neglecting to rejoice

More life to live
More love to give
More memories to be made
More gifts to share

A life cut short
But by the Master who holds the tools
Who shapes and molds
And ordains the number of our days

Our days are written
By the Author of Life
He writes our story
Beginning, middle, and end

This Master
This Author
Is the lover of our soul
And the lifter of our head

He gives
And He takes away
He begins
And He ends

Cut short?
Perhaps
But designed, authored, and sculpted
By the Creator of the universe

The One who holds the stars in His hands
Holds us
Each moment, each breath
Until we breathe our last

God loves
God gives
God comforts
God reigns

WHY I SHOT JESUS IN THE HEAD

I accidentally shot Jesus in the head with the hand sanitizer. I didn’t mean to do it. It just happened.

We have new hand sanitizers everywhere at work. The ones you mount on the wall. And they squirt out purifying, decontaminating foam. I don’t like the foam. I prefer the goo. In my expert hand sanitizing opinion, the goo does a better job of fully cleansing each and every part of my hands. The foam, on the other hand, seems like it evaporates into nothingness as I attempt to spread it around. To each her own, I suppose.

I digress…

Back to Jesus…

I didn’t want to get rid of the monster-sized goo pump sanitizer we previously had, so I moved it over on top of the piano. I don’t know if you have a gallon jug of hand sanitizer goo on top of your piano or not, but we do. Hand sanitizer on one end…Jesus bust on the other. The Jesus bust is a whole other issue, but for now I’ll let that one go.

Because I have quite a bit of physical contact with elderly people at my job, I feel the need to either wash my hands a lot or at least sanitize them. (I hope that doesn’t sound too weird or rude.) So I headed over to the piano, passing up not one but two foam sanitizers, so I could fill my hands with the goo. One pump usually does it for me, but if I’ve touched several “yucky” people—I’m just keeping it real, y’all—I’ll go for two.

So, one hand on the pump apparatus, one hand down below to catch all the disinfecting, sterilizing goo. Apparently because of the angle of the dried-on goo from its previous use, instead of squirting downward as gravity might have it, it shot out sideways…three feet to the left…right onto Jesus’ head. Bless Him!

For a hot second I was confused because my hand was not filled with the goo. But then I laughed. Out loud. Hard. Because I just shot Jesus in the head with the hand sanitizer. This was funny to me. And oh-so-ironic. Here I was, standing over the purifying goo and Jesus. Jesus now having cleansing goo running down from the crown of His head, over His face. Jesus being cleansed. Purified. Yeah…AS IF!

This is the irony.

Jesus isn’t in need of cleansing. I am. Jesus isn’t in need of purifying. I am. And it takes a whole lot more than a monster-sized jug of hand sanitizer to disinfect, and sterilize, and purify this sinful, unrighteous self of mine.

“If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.” (1 John 1:9)

I still chuckle each time I head over to the piano to get sanitized. I see the Jesus bust and am reminded that it’s all because of Him I can stand forgiven…cleansed…and purified.

Thanks be to God that He doesn’t get tired of me coming to Him for forgiveness. For a “do over.” For a clean, fresh start. That’s the kind of faithful God we have. And because He created humor, I’m sure He doesn’t mind that I shot Jesus in the head with the hand sanitizer.

 

OVERCOMING OUR UNSUPPORTED PERSONALITY

Recently at work, I went to print a word document from my computer. When the paper came out of the printer, all it had on it in the upper left-hand corner in small print was this, “Unsupported Personality:  PCL.”

I thought to myself, “Wait…what?” So I tried to print again. Same thing happened. That obviously was not the document I was trying to print. The printer was working fine prior to this. So I turned off the printer, let it take a break, rebooted my computer and tried again. Guess what? Same message, “Unsupported Personality:  PCL.”

Now, I’m not very techie at all. I have absolutely no idea what that error message means. So, after being quite frustrated, I quit trying to print, stacked my three unwanted documents on my desk and went about my business.

Every time I passed by my desk I saw the words on the documents, “Unsupported Personality.” Three pages with the same words on it. Again, I’m not very techie, but somehow in the communication from my computer to my printer, something went awry. The printer didn’t like the communication it received from my computer. Or perhaps my printer just couldn’t handle it. So it spit out an error message, “Unsupported Personality.”

I moved past frustrated and became intrigued. You know, there have been several times in my life when I didn’t appreciate the communication I was receiving from someone. There are times when I just can’t handle it. There are times when people say hurtful things, treat me poorly, tear me down, ridicule me, fail to respect me, etc. Ugly, but true.

So maybe I’ll keep those documents with the words “Unsupported Personality.” I’ll have them readily available for the next time someone is unkind or disrespectful or rude to me. And I’ll grab one and give it to them. For me, the message simply states that I won’t support that personality trait that they’re sending me.

What do you think? Is that acceptable?

Unsupported PersonalityBut here’s the thing…they could keep those documents with the words “Unsupported Personality” and freely give them back to me when I treated them with the same disrespect or rudeness, when I said unkind or hurtful things to them. Ouch!

Truth is we all have certain parts of our nature, our personality, our character that are less-than-desirable. We all get grouchy, short with others, say unkind things, etc. Ugly, but true.

I don’t want anyone to hand me a document that says, “Unsupported Personality.” I don’t like the realization that I’ve treated someone else poorly, that I’ve torn them down rather than built them up, that I’ve been rude or callous unfriendly. I don’t like it, but it’s true of me.

Okay, so maybe I won’t keep those documents and hand them out to people who tick me off. Here’s what I’ll try to do instead:

“Summing up: Be agreeable, be sympathetic, be loving, be compassionate, be humble. That goes for all of you, no exceptions. No retaliation. No sharp-tongued sarcasm. Instead, bless—that’s your job, to bless. You’ll be a blessing and also get a blessing.

Whoever wants to embrace life and see the day fill up with good, Here’s what you do: Say nothing evil or hurtful; Snub evil and cultivate good; run after peace for all you’re worth. God looks on all this with approval, listening and responding well to what He’s asked…”  (1 Peter 3:8-12a, MSG).

 

A NEW YEAR’S INVITATION

I had the privilege of seeing the Trans-Siberian Orchestra perform in Kansas City the day after Christmas. This is a show I’ve been longing to see for many, many years but never wanted to spend the money to see it. But this year we were blessed by a connection of my husband’s at Time Warner Cable and got to enjoy the show for free in their executive suite at the Sprint Center. All I can say is “Wow!” If you ever get the chance to see them, go for it.

But the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, as talented as they are, is not the point of my blog today…

I was blown away and caught off guard by one of the numbers they performed. It was one of their more “quiet” songs—no laser lights, no pyrotechnics. Just a gal singing under one lone spotlight and someone else in the dimly lit background playing the keyboard. The song is called For the Sake of Our Brother, but in it contains the first verse and chorus of O Come All Ye Faithful. What I’m used to each year around Christmas is the traditional, almost boring rendition of O Come All Ye Faithful that we sing in church. Don’t misunderstand… I’ve always liked the song. But as most Christmas hymns do, they become routine, humdrum, and uninteresting at best. I hate that fact, but it’s a fact nonetheless. But as this gal sang the other night, she sang this particular song with such power and depth, yet with such vulnerability and purity. She sang as if she really meant the invitation she was singing about.

O come all ye faithful…
…Joyful and triumphant

Come and behold Him…

Come and adore Him…
…O come let us adore Him

I sat there speechless. Mesmerized. Sucked into the invitation. And personally challenged. I love Jesus. But adore Him? I adore cute little puppies, soft warm kittens, and huggable sweet babies. But adore Jesus? What?

If you look in the thesaurus, “adore” is associated with words like worship, esteem, revere, glorify, exalt, and honor. Somehow that no longer fits cute little puppies, soft warm kittens, and huggable sweet babies. It moves waaayyy beyond that.

The invitation in the song is for us not only to behold Jesus, but to adore Jesus. To come faithfully, with joy, and victoriously adore Him. And although we sing that song at Christmas time, I’m pretty sure the invitation extends beyond that hemmed-in, commercialized, two or three week time frame.

For the last week—since I left the concert—the idea of adoring Jesus hasn’t left my mind. In the things I read, in the experiences I’ve had, in the people I’ve encountered, the idea of adoring Jesus has come to the surface over and over again.

You see, I want my 2016 to be about adoring Jesus. I want to be faithful in doing that. I want to experience joy and triumph in 2016. And as much as I’d like that joy and triumph to be in things like my own personal happiness, my own career stability and advancement, deep down I’d rather that joy and triumph be in adoring Jesus. I want to faithfully, joyfully, and triumphantly adore Jesus—so much so that it affects the way I think, act, talk, relate to people, pray, react, read, give, and all that other stuff.

Jesus…

He’s the King. He’s the Christ. He’s the Rock. He’s the Redeemer.

2016 ChallengeHe’s the one who came to save the world. He’s the one who forgives us, loves us tenderly, gives us do-overs, never leaves us, treats us with grace, grabs us close when we’re hurt or afraid, leads us when we’re lost, and willingly doles out mercy. If you think about that…what’s not to adore?

So the invitation in the song is my challenge to myself for 2016. But the invitation in the song is for you as well. It’s a collective kind of thing.

So, are you willing to accept the invitation? Do you want in on the challenge? After all, it’s not about ME. It’s about US. It’s a New Year’s challenge for US.

“O COME…LET US ADORE HIM!”

(Note: If you’d like to watch a video of the song I’m referring to by the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, click here.)

 

 

 

8 THINGS TO STAND FOR IN A WORLD THAT’S FALLING DOWN

There’s a popular song on the radio that I really like to sing along with, but the lyrics trouble me.

Oh, Lord, I’m still not sure what I stand for…What Do I Stand For?
What do I stand for?
Oh what do I stand for?
Most nights I don’t know any more…

Isn’t that sad? At the end of the day, when it’s all said and done, not to have any idea what you stand for. To be that clueless, or misguided, or misinformed, or confused, or torn. But I think, unfortunately, this would describe a growing number of people in the world.

Here’s the problem as I see it:  This crazy, messed up world we live in has hijacked our truth, our morals, our values, our ethics, our virtues, our integrity, our standards. We have no idea what we stand for because we live in a world where tolerance reigns and truth seems to be a moving target. We live in a world that celebrates boundary-less individuality. We live in a world where any behavior, any response, any treatment, any reaction is acceptable because, after all, “I’m just being ME.” Barf!

The great country music theologian Aaron Tippin sang a song back in the early 90’s which stated:

You’ve got to stand for something or you’ll fall for anything
You’ve got to be your own man not a puppet on a string
Never compromise what’s right and uphold your family name
You’ve got to stand for something or you’ll fall for anything

Here’s what I think we should be standing for (otherwise we’ll fall for just about anything)…

Stand for:

  • Treating people fairly and justly–God loves people and so should we
  • Grace–even when you think you’re right, grace must win out
  • Giving, not getting–change your perspective from what you can get out of something to what you can contribute
  • Honesty–if you tell the truth the first time, you won’t have to remember what you said
  • Positivity–negativity is a buzz kill any way you slice it
  • Peace–though you can’t control the actions and reactions of others, you can control yours. As much as it depends on you, live at peace
  • Hard work–slothfulness and apathy will never get you where you want to be
  • Compassion–remember not everyone is as cool as you, as fortunate as you, as put together as you, as healthy as you, as problem-free as you, as smart as you, nor as talented as you

What about you? What do you stand for?

IT’S FUN TO BE A ROYALS FAN AGAIN!

It was the spring of 1985. I was a senior in high school. My best friend had a huge crush on a guy by the name of George Brett. You ever heard of him? Yep, he played 3rd base for the Kansas City Royals. Now when I say “crush,” I mean partial infatuation actually.

I’m not sure if it was opening day or not, but we skipped school one afternoon to go the game. Although it earned us a day of In School Suspension, it was worth it. Needless to say, the Royals went on to win the World Series that year. Yes, it was fun to be a Royals fan in 1985!

Royals T pic

My friend and I went to the games often, paid less than five bucks for a general admission ticket, stayed after the games, chatted with the players, and took lots of pictures with them. If Facebook was around back then, we would have loaded it up with selfies with the Royals. 🙂 Instead we took our film to the Kodak booth, waited a week for it to be developed, and lined our locker with our prized pics of us and our favorite players.

The players back then seemed to play for an absolute love of the game. It was fun to watch. There was camaraderie, unity, teamwork, effort, hustle, and excitement. Thirty years ago, the highest paid MLB player was Mike Schmidt of the Philadelphia Phillies who hauled in a little over $2 million. The highest paid MLB player this year is Clayton Kershaw of the Los Angeles Dodgers. His 2015 earnings are somewhere around $31.2 million. I don’t think I’ll even comment about that absurdity.

I took a hiatus from baseball fandom for several years. The Royals stunk it up for the longest time. They were terrible. They knew it. The fans knew it. All of KC knew it. That and the fact that cable TV has now monopolized almost all of the MLB games, those without cable (that’d be me), just drift off into the baseball-less sunset.

But it was fun to be a Royals fan in 1985. It’s fun to be one 30 years later, and I’ll tell you why. These guys seem to once again play for an absolute love of the game. It’s like watching little league boys in a grown up ballpark. They’re young, fun, aggressive, passionate, and know they have some unfinished business from last year’s heartbreaking loss in Game 7 of the World Series. Ned Yost, the manager of the team, is a fairly hardcore strategist, but it works. And he allows these guys to have their fun, yet hold up a high standard and even higher expectations.

Yep, it’s fun to be a Royals fan again. Here’s to hoping that this fan will be celebrating deep into October. (Or as those of us in Kansas City call it, “oKCtober”.)

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